Thursday, September 20, 2018

Simple, Routine, Repetitive with One and Two-Step Tasks -- Not Necessarily Unskilled


Simple one and two-step tasks and reasoning level is not necessarily unskilled work.  Of the circa 13,000 DOT codes, I found a handful that carry the code for reasoning level 1 and are not unskilled.  These 15 occupations all have the temperament for repetitive work with six carrying an additional temperament. 

DOTCode
DOTTitle
SVP
REASONING
TEMP
363.687-010
GLOVE FORMER
3
1
RJ
379.687-014
MOSQUITO SPRAYER
3
1
R
520.687-050
PLUG SHAPER, HAND
3
1
R
529.685-234
SUCKER-MACHINE OPERATOR
3
1
R
529.687-122
KISS SETTER, HAND
4
1
R
630.687-010
PULLEY MAINTAINER
3
1
RT
690.685-058
BURNISHER
3
1
RT
692.685-126
MOUNTER II
3
1
R
692.686-070
PASTER, HAT LINING
3
1
RU
709.687-018
HOT-TOP-LINER HELPER
3
1
R
709.687-058
WIRE BENDER
3
1
RT
734.687-050
COVERED-BUCKLE ASSEMBLER
3
1
R
780.687-026
MATTRESS STRIPPER
4
1
R
849.684-010
BOAT BUFFER, PLASTIC
3
1
R
930.664-010
CASER
3
1
RS



















Our quest today is to understand how reasoning level 1 work with at least one of the temperaments for repetitive work can require skills.  The answer rests in the regulations.  20 C.F.R. § 404.1568(b) states:
A job may be classified as semi-skilled where coordination and dexterity are necessary, as when hands or feet must be moved quickly to do repetitive tasks.
Coordination and dexterity are not skills.  The Revised Handbook for Analyzing Jobs defines the aptitudes in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles and Selected Characteristics of Occupations electronic files.  Chapter 9 defines aptitudes:
Aptitudes, a component of Worker Characteristics, are the capacities or specific abilities which an individual must have in order to learn to perform a given work activity.
 Aptitudes, a component of Worker Characteristics, are the capacities or specific abilities which an individual must have in order to learn to perform a given work activity.
 Every aptitude factor must be considered independently in the rating process for each job. The analyst estimates the level of each aptitude required of the worker for average, satisfactory performance based on a careful evaluation of the work activities of the job and the specific worker abilities which can be identified in terms of the aptitudes. Then the appropriate aptitude level number is assigned. Certain of the aptitudes can be identified through study of the physical actions which the worker performs, such as Motor Coordination, Finger Dexterity, and Eye-Hand-Foot Coordination; other Aptitudes, such as Spatial, Numerical, and General Learning Ability, are identified by considering worker judgments and other mental processes involved in performing the job satisfactorily. Aptitude levels are determined by comparing the tasks of the job with the aptitude definitions, interpretive information, and the examples of work activities shown for each level which appear in the next section of this chapter.
Aptitudes are not learned, they are the foundation upon which the worker must rest in order to learn how to perform an occupation.  Without the aptitude, the person cannot learn to proficiently learn how to perform the occupation. 

The long quote from page 9-2 mentions the aptitudes for motor coordination; eye-hand-foot coordination; and finger dexterity.  Missing from the list is manual dexterity but that is one of the 11 characteristics described.  The RHAJ defines these four characteristics:
MOTOR COORDINATION: The ability to coordinate eyes and hands or fingers rapidly and accurately in making precise movements with speed. Ability to make a movement response accurately and swiftly.
 FINGER DEXTERITY: The ability to move the fingers and manipulate. small objects with the fingers rapidly or accurately.
 MANUAL DEXTERITY: The ability to move the hands easily and skillfully. Ability to work with the hands in placing and turning motions.
 EYE-HAND-FOOT COORDINATION: The ability to move the hand and foot coordinately with each other in accordance with visual stimuli.
This information requires that we look again at our list, this time including those four temperaments. 

DOTCode
DOTTitle
MOTOR
FINGER
MANUAL
E-H-F
363.687-010
GLOVE FORMER
3
4
3
5
379.687-014
MOSQUITO SPRAYER
4
4
3
4
520.687-050
PLUG SHAPER, HAND
4
4
4
5
529.685-234
SUCKER-MACHINE OPERATOR
3
4
3
5
529.687-122
KISS SETTER, HAND
3
3
3
5
630.687-010
PULLEY MAINTAINER
4
4
3
4
690.685-058
BURNISHER
3
4
3
4
692.685-126
MOUNTER II
3
4
3
5
692.686-070
PASTER, HAT LINING
4
4
4
5
709.687-018
HOT-TOP-LINER HELPER
4
4
3
5
709.687-058
WIRE BENDER
4
4
3
4
734.687-050
COVERED-BUCKLE ASSEMBLER
3
2
3
5
780.687-026
MATTRESS STRIPPER
4
4
3
5
849.684-010
BOAT BUFFER, PLASTIC
3
4
3
4
930.664-010
CASER
3
4
3
4

One occupation does not require at least average coordination or dexterity in at least one category.  What we can infer is that once the worker has the aptitude, it takes over 30 days to learn to do the job functions quickly and accurately to perform repetitive tasks using that coordination or dexterity.  Reasoning level 1 and the temperament for repetitive tasks form a good starting point for that one- and two-step tasks in a routine and repetitive work environment, but the analysis should continue. 

Look up the summary descriptions of all 13,000 DOT occupations including the electronic files at Occu Collect for free, simply by registering.   



Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Information Clerk - Unskilled Reasoning Level 4

Every once in a while, we get information clerk in response to a light exertion, occasional fingering residual functional capacity.  The free DOT-SCO summary report on Occu Collect confirms the basics:



237.367-018 INFORMATION CLERK

Industry: (motor trans.; r.r. trans.; water trans.

Reasoning: 4

PHYSICAL DEMANDS:
CL
BA
ST
KN
CO
CW
RE
HA
FI
FE
TA
HE
TS
NA
FA
DP
AC
CV
FV
N
N
N
N
N
N
F
F
O
N
C
C
N
F
N
N
N
N
N


APTITUDES:
G
V
N
S
P
Q
K
F
M
E
C
3
2
3
4
4
3
4
3
4
5
5

The highlights of the occupation extracted from the report is the three-industry designation; reasoning level 4; occasional fingering; and constant talking/hearing. The aptitudes describe the work as requiring average general learning ability, above average verbal, average clerical, and average finger dexterity. Any limitation in dealing with the public, below average academic performance, less than stellar verbal communication, or a history of demonstrated clerical perception should knock this occupation out of the running.  The occasional fingering is also betrayed by the average finger dexterity.  This is the quantitative (occasional) versus qualitative (average dexterity) debate.  If a person truly has a limitation to occasional fingering, that implies some loss of ability to use the hands well for dexterity purposes.

Examples of average finger dexterity from the Revised Hanndbook for Analyzing Jobs include (1) feeding a tungsten filament in a light bulb; (2) taking dictation by shorthand; (3) installing, maintaining, and services a communication system; (4) cutting and styling hair; (5) operating a look; (6) constructing and repairing dental appliances; and (7) welding metal parts together.  It is important to develop evidence of a lack of capacity for those functions if a vocational expert identifies this or any other occupation with finger dexterity level 3.  

The other component of this occupation rests in the DOT description -- the industry designation.  Receptionists and information clerks are generally unskilled but has a typical requirement of a high school diploma or equivalent.  


43-4171 Receptionists and information clerks

Typical Education Needed
High school diploma or equivalent
Work Experience in a Related Occupation
None
Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency
Short-term on-the-job training
2016 Employment
1,053,700

The employment projections report that transportation and warehousing (NAICS 48-490) employ 6,500 receptionists and information clerks. Air transportation and transit and ground passenger transportation amount to 1,000 jobs total.  (NAICS 481000 and 485000).  Scenic and sightseeing transportation and support activities for transportation (NAICS 487-80) employ an additional 2,000 receptionists and information clerks.  An estimate that does not start there ignore the industry designation in the DOT and therefore has an apparent conflict with the DOT -- if you present the employment projections.  

Finally, the ORS confirms that 7% of jobs are SVP 1 and 46% of jobs in this group are SVP 2.  The rest are semi-skilled or skilled.  Receptionists and information clerks require a high school education or equivalent in 81.8% of jobs.  And it isn't until we get to the 75th percentile that receptionists and information clerks stand more than 1/3d of the day and then just 2.8 hours per day.  The work does permit a sit-stand option in 59.7% of jobs.  I pulled the data from the Occu Collect ORS report (education, training, and experience and then physical demands).  


Just because the vocational expert identified jobs doesn't mean that we are through.  The SCO, aptitudes, industry designation, and the ORS provide paths to removing this occupation from the list.