Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Reasoning Level 2, Not Repetitive and Yes, Still Skilled Work

We discussed the finding of reasoning level 2 work with a temperament for repetitive work activity as skilled work and therefore not simple repetitive work.  The DOT lists another 14 occupations that have the designation of reasoning level 2, do not have the temperament for repetitive work, and are SVP 5 and 6 -- skilled work.  The 14 occupations:

DOT Code
DOT Name
378.684-022
INFANTRY INDIRECT FIRE CREWMEMBER
502.664-018
STEEL-POURER HELPER
514.582-010
VACUUM CASTER
575.684-026
GATHERER
619.484-010
ORNAMENTAL-METAL-WORKER HELPER
720.684-014
PHONOGRAPH-CARTRIDGE ASSEMBLER
732.684-118
SKI REPAIRER, PRODUCTION
774.384-010
INSPECTOR II
805.664-010
BOILERMAKER HELPER II
842.684-014
DRY-WALL APPLICATOR
863.664-010
BLOWER INSULATOR
951.685-014
FIRER, LOW PRESSURE
952.687-014
SUBSTATION-OPERATOR HELPER
962.687-022
GRIP

Like the list of R2 repetitive occupations, none of these occupations have a significant need to deal with people so that is not the reason for their skilled classification. Inspector II has a significant worker function for data, compiling:
3 Compiling: Gathering, collating, or classifying information about data, people, or things. Reporting and/or carrying out a prescribed action in relation to the information is frequently involved.
That "3" is the fourth digit in the data-people-things cluster. These occupations require significant worker functions with things, mostly "4" with one each of 2, 5, and 7. From Appendix B of the DOT:
2 Operating-Controlling: Starting, stopping, controlling, and adjusting the progress of machines or equipment. Operating machines involves setting up and adjusting the machine or material(s) as the work progresses. Controlling involves observing gauges, dials, etc., and turning valves and other devices to regulate factors such as temperature, pressure, flow of liquids, speed of pumps, and reactions of materials.

4 Manipulating: Using body members, tools, or special devices to work, move, guide, or place objects or materials. Involves some latitude for judgment with regard to precision attained and selecting appropriate tool, object, or material, although this is readily manifest.

5 Tending: Starting, stopping, and observing the functioning of machines and equipment. Involves adjusting materials or controls of the machine, such as changing guides, adjusting timers and temperature gauges, turning valves to allow flow of materials, and flipping switches in response to lights. Little judgment is involved in making these adjustments.

7 Handling: Using body members, handtools, and/or special devices to work, move, or carry objects or materials. Involves little or no latitude for judgment with regard to attainment of standards or in selecting appropriate tool, object, or materials.
These worker functions implicate the SSA definition of skilled work:
Skilled work requires qualifications in which a person uses judgment to determine the machine and manual operations to be performed in order to obtain the proper form, quality, or quantity of material to be produced. Skilled work may require laying out work, estimating quality, determining the suitability and needed quantities of materials, making precise measurements, reading blueprints or other specifications, or making necessary computations or mechanical adjustments to control or regulate the work. Other skilled jobs may require dealing with people, facts, or figures or abstract ideas at a high level of complexity.
Infantry indirect fire crewman is the only occupation that requires a temperament for working under stress. It also requires exercising judgment. Including the infantry crewman occupation, 12 of the 14 reasoning level 2 non-repetitive occupations require the exercise of judgment as a temperament. Ten of those occupations require the temperament for attaining precise set limits and tolerances. The remaining two occupations (boiler maker II and grip) require the temperament for performing a variety of duties.

The three key temperaments of use of judgment, attaining set limits, and performing a variety of tasks are defined in the Revised Handbook for Analyzing Jobs (Dept. of Labor 1991) as:
Performing a VARIETY of Duties: Involves frequent changes of tasks involving different aptitudes, technologies, techniques, procedures, working conditions, physical demands, or degrees of attentiveness without loss of efficiency or composure. The involvement of the worker in two or more work fields may be a clue that this temperament is required.
Attaining Precise Set Limits, TOLERANCES, and Standards: Involves adhering to and achieving exact levels of performance, using precision measuring instruments, tools, and machines to attain precise dimensions; preparing exact verbal and numerical records; and complying with precise instruments and specifications for materials, methods, procedures, and techniques to attain specified standards. 
Making JUDGMENTS and Decisions: Involves solving problems, making evaluations, or reaching conclusions based on subjective or objective criteria, such as the five senses, knowledge, past experiences, or quantifiable or factual data.
Performing a variety of tasks, attaining precise set limits, and making judgments are quintessentially inconsistent with a limitation to simple repetitive or routine tasks. Next we will look at unskilled occupations that share these temperaments with the same question, are they simple repetitive or routine tasks.

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