Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Reasoning Level 2, Temperament for Repetitive, Must Be Simple Repetitive Unskilled Work -- No

I compiled a list of 27 DOT codes that carry reasoning level 2 and have a temperament for repetitive work activity.  Here's the list:

DOT Code
DOT Name
520.684-010
ALMOND-PASTE MOLDER
556.484-010
SCAGLIOLA MECHANIC
558.585-010
CATALYTIC-CONVERTER-OPERATOR HELPER
559.664-014
PILOT-CONTROL-OPERATOR HELPER
612.683-010
MANIPULATOR OPERATOR
629.684-014
MILLER, HEAD, ASSISTANT, WET PROCESS
630.684-022
PUMP-SERVICER HELPER
651.686-022
ROLL TENDER
700.684-066
RING STAMPER
706.684-054
FITTER II
711.684-014
CEMENTER
715.584-010
DIAL REFINISHER
736.684-022
BARREL REPAIRER
737.684-038
SHELL ASSEMBLER
739.684-022
BRUSH MATERIAL PREPARER
739.684-086
HAIR WORKER
739.684-154
TICKET-CHOPPER ASSEMBLER
739.684-186
PIPE STEM REPAIRER
790.684-014
CIGAR MAKER
790.684-022
ROLLER, HAND
801.664-014
UTILITY WORKER, MERCHANT MILL
840.684-010
GLASS TINTER
861.664-010
MARBLE FINISHER
861.664-014
TERRAZZO FINISHER
861.664-018
TILE FINISHER
862.684-010
JUNCTION MAKER
955.463-010
SANITARY LANDFILL OPERATOR

Other than the reasoning level and the temperament for repetitive work, these 31 DOT codes have one other characteristic in common -- they are all skilled occupations, one with an SVP 6 and the rest SVP 5.  The next question is, "what makes them skilled?"  We start with the definition of skilled work from the regulation:
Skilled work requires qualifications in which a person uses judgment to determine the machine and manual operations to be performed in order to obtain the proper form, quality, or quantity of material to be produced. Skilled work may require laying out work, estimating quality, determining the suitability and needed quantities of materials, making precise measurements, reading blueprints or other specifications, or making necessary computations or mechanical adjustments to control or regulate the work. Other skilled jobs may require dealing with people, facts, or figures or abstract ideas at a high level of complexity.
First criterion for skilled work is the use of judgment.  Five of our DOT codes require use of judgment as a temperament: 

DOT Code
DOT Name
520.684-010
ALMOND-PASTE MOLDER
700.684-066
RING STAMPER
706.684-054
FITTER II
861.664-010
MARBLE FINISHER
861.664-014
TERRAZZO FINISHER

The next criterion involves laying out the materials for work.  This corresponds to the temperament for working under supervision.  Just two DOT codes have the working under supervision temperament:

DOT Code
DOT Name
651.686-022
ROLL TENDER
955.463-010
SANITARY LANDFILL OPERATOR

The next criterion to look at concerns the need to put the product in proper form, quality, and quantity.  The electronic files use the temperament for attaining precise set limits and tolerances.  This list includes 23 DOT codes, with three of those also requiring the use of judgment:

DOT Code
DOT Name
520.684-010
ALMOND-PASTE MOLDER
556.484-010
SCAGLIOLA MECHANIC
558.585-010
CATALYTIC-CONVERTER-OPERATOR HELPER
559.664-014
PILOT-CONTROL-OPERATOR HELPER
612.683-010
MANIPULATOR OPERATOR
629.684-014
MILLER, HEAD, ASSISTANT, WET PROCESS
630.684-022
PUMP-SERVICER HELPER
700.684-066
RING STAMPER
706.684-054
FITTER II
711.684-014
CEMENTER
715.584-010
DIAL REFINISHER
736.684-022
BARREL REPAIRER
737.684-038
SHELL ASSEMBLER
739.684-022
BRUSH MATERIAL PREPARER
739.684-086
HAIR WORKER
739.684-154
TICKET-CHOPPER ASSEMBLER
739.684-186
PIPE STEM REPAIRER
790.684-014
CIGAR MAKER
790.684-022
ROLLER, HAND
801.664-014
UTILITY WORKER, MERCHANT MILL
840.684-010
GLASS TINTER
861.664-018
TILE FINISHER
862.684-010
JUNCTION MAKER

Of the 27 DOT codes with a reasoning level 2 and a temperament for repetitive work activity, none of them have a significant data code (the fourth digit) or people code (the middle digit).  All 27 of the DOT codes have a significant things code (the sixth digit).  The most common things code among these 27 DOTs is "4" the code for manipulating.  Two of the DOT codes require driving-operating (things code 3); one requires tending (things code 5); and one requires feeding-off bearing (things code 6).  None of these occupations require  dealing with people, facts, or figures or abstract ideas at a high level of complexity, the untouched hallmark for skilled work.  The DOT Appendix B defines these worker functions as:

3 Driving-Operating: Starting, stopping, and controlling the actions of machines or equipment for which a course must be steered or which must be guided to control the movement of things or people for a variety of purposes. Involves such activities as observing gauges and dials, estimating distances and determining speed and direction of other objects, turning cranks and wheels, and pushing or pulling gear lifts or levers. Includes such machines as cranes, conveyor systems, tractors, furnace-charging machines, paving machines, and hoisting machines. Excludes manually powered machines, such as handtrucks and dollies, and power-assisted machines, such as electric wheelbarrows and handtrucks.
4 Manipulating: Using body members, tools, or special devices to work, move, guide, or place objects or materials. Involves some latitude for judgment with regard to precision attained and selecting appropriate tool, object, or material, although this is readily manifest.
5 Tending: Starting, stopping, and observing the functioning of machines and equipment. Involves adjusting materials or controls of the machine, such as changing guides, adjusting timers and temperature gauges, turning valves to allow flow of materials, and flipping switches in response to lights. Little judgment is involved in making these adjustments.
6 Feeding-Offbearing: Inserting, throwing, dumping, or placing materials in or removing them from machines or equipment which are automatic or tended or operated by other workers.

What is clear from this exercise is that reasoning level 2 and a temperament for repetitive work does not necessarily equate to unskilled work that meets the "SRT" limitation found in the state agency workup.  Simple repetitive work requires a significantly more granular examination of all the data presented by the DOT, SCO, and the electronic files. 

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