Thursday, September 27, 2018

Marker -- Revisited and Dismantled

We addressed the occupation of markers last year through the lens of the Occupational Requirements Survey.  We examine the occupation today from the perspective of education.  To recap the DOT:

DOT Narrative: 209.587-034 MARKER (retail trade; wholesale tr.) alternate titles: marking clerk; merchandise marker; price marker; ticket maker Marks and attaches price tickets to articles of merchandise to record price and identifying information: Marks selling price by hand on boxes containing merchandise, or on price tickets. Ties, glues, sews, or staples price ticket to each article. Presses lever or plunger of mechanism that pins, pastes, ties, or staples ticket to article. ay record number and types of articles marked and pack them in boxes. May compare printed price tickets with entries on purchase order to verify accuracy and notify supervisor of discrepancies. ay print information on tickets, using ticket-printing machine [TICKETER (any industry); TICKET PRINTER AND TAGGER (garment)]. GOE: 05.09.03 STRENGTH: L GED: R2 M1 L1 SVP: 2 DLU: 77
The codes for reasoning and and data are important to this occupation. 

REASONING DEVELOPMENT: 2
Apply commonsense understanding to carry out detailed but uninvolved written or oral instructions. Deal with problems involving a few concrete variables in or from standardized situations.
Definitions of Worker Functions
Data: 5 - Significant
Copying: Transcribing, entering, or posting data.
 The aptitudes from the electronic files of the SCO provide insight into the educationally related innate abilities:

General Learning Ability: 4, Lower Degree of Aptitude Ability - Lowest Third Excluding Bottom 10%
GENERAL LEARNING ABILITY: The ability to "catch on" or understand instructions and underlying principles; the ability to reason and make judgments. Closely related to doing well in school.

Verbal Aptitude: 4, Lower Degree of Aptitude Ability - Lowest Third Excluding Bottom 10%
VERBAL APTITUDE: The ability to understand the meaning of words and to use them effectively. Ability to comprehend language, to understand relationships between words, and to understand the meanings of whole sentences and paragraphs.

Numerical Aptitude: 4, Lower Degree of Aptitude Ability - Lowest Third Excluding Bottom 10%
NUMERICAL APTITUDE: The ability to perform arithmetic operations quickly and accurately.
Interpretive Information for Analysts: Consider activities. such as making change from currency of one denomination to another. keeping time or production records. using math or geometry to layout geometric patterns. making accurate numerical measurements. and making or checking numerical entries. Consider the complexity of numerical operations as well as speed required and volume of arithmetic activity.

Spatial Aptitude: 4, Lower Degree of Aptitude Ability - Lowest Third Excluding Bottom 10%
SPATIAL APTITUDE: The ability to think visually of geometric forms and to comprehend the two-dimensional representation of three-dimensional objects. The ability to recognize the relationships resulting from the movement of objects in space.
Interpretive Information for Analysts: Frequently described as the ability to "visualize" objects of two- or three-dimensions or to think visually of geometric forms. Work examples are such activities as laying out. positioning, and aligning objects; observing movements of objects. such as vehicles in traffic or machines in operation. and comprehending how the movements affect their spatial position concurrently; achieving balanced design; and understanding and anticipating the effects of physical stresses in structural situations.

Form Perception: 4, Lower Degree of Aptitude Ability - Lowest Third Excluding Bottom 10%
FORM PERCEPTION: The ability to perceive pertinent detail in objects or in pictorial or graphic material. Ability to make visual comparisons and discriminations and see slight differences in shapes and shadings of figures and widths and lengths of lines.
Interpretive Information for Analysts: Consider such activities as inspecting surfaces for consistency in coloring, Scratches, flaws, grain, texture, and the like; observing lint, dust, etc., on surfaces; determining if patterns are correct or match; and recognizing small parts.
NOTE: Spatial deals with visualization of the shape of objects as well as comprehension of forms in space. Form perception, on the other hand. pertains to the perception of surface details.

Clerical Perception: 3, Medium Degree of Aptitude Ability - Middle Third
CLERICAL PERCEPTION: The ability 10 perceive pertinent detail in verbal or tabular material. Ability to observe differences in copy, 10 proofread words and numbers, and to avoid perceptual errors in arithmetic computation. A measure of speed of perception is required in many industrial jobs even when the job does not have verbal or numerical content.
Interpretive Information for Analysts: In trade and craft jobs consider the work orders, specifications, dials, gauges, and measuring devices which must be read. Consider whether perceptual errors in reading words and numbers or in rapidly comparing similar forms or shapes would result in defective work.
The person performing the work of a marker needs average clerical perception for the significant worker functions of transcribing, entering, or posting data in the performance of detailed but uninvolved tasks with a few concrete variables from standardized situations. 

Markers belong to stock clerks and order fillers (SOC 43-5081) and more specifically to the O*NET detailed group of marking clerks (O*NET 43-5081.02).  The OOH does not address the detailed groups carved out by the O*NET, it addresses the SOC group: 

 43-5081 Stock clerks and order fillers
Typical Education Needed
High school diploma or equivalent
Work Experience in a Related Occupation
None
Typical On-The-Job Training Needed to Attain Competency
Short-term on-the-job training
2016 Employment
2,008,600




BLS reports:

Education Levels of Incumbents

43-5081 Stock clerks and order fillers

Typical Education Needed
High school diploma or equivalent
Less than a High School Education
13.4
High School Education or Equivalent
42.7
Some College, No Degree
25.6
Associates Degree
7.5
Bachelor's Degree
9.1
Masters's Degree
1.4
Doctoral or Professional Degree
0.3

The O*NET OnLine describes worker functions and requirements:


Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Contact With Others — How much does this job require the worker to be in contact with others (face-to-face, by telephone, or otherwise) in order to perform it?
60
Constant contact with others
38
Contact with others most of the time
0
Contact with others about half the time
1
Occasional contact with others
0
No contact with others
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Coordinate or Lead Others — How important is it to coordinate or lead others in accomplishing work activities in this job?
29
Extremely important
23
Very important
21
Important
19
Fairly important
9
Not important at all
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Deal With External Customers — How important is it to work with external customers or the public in this job?
39
Extremely important
23
Very important
11
Important
20
Fairly important
8
Not important at all
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Deal With Physically Aggressive People — How frequently does this job require the worker to deal with physical aggression of violent individuals?
0
Every day
0
Once a week or more but not every day
3
Once a month or more but not every week
30
Once a year or more but not every month
68
Never
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Deal With Unpleasant or Angry People — How frequently does the worker have to deal with unpleasant, angry, or discourteous individuals as part of the job requirements?
1
Every day
56
Once a week or more but not every day
15
Once a month or more but not every week
27
Once a year or more but not every month
1
Never
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Electronic Mail — How often do you use electronic mail in this job?
7
Every day
29
Once a week or more but not every day
0
Once a month or more but not every week
0
Once a year or more but not every month
64
Never
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Face-to-Face Discussions — How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?
90
Every day
8
Once a week or more but not every day
0
Once a month or more but not every week
1
Once a year or more but not every month
1
Never
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Frequency of Conflict Situations — How often are there conflict situations the employee has to face in this job?
29
Every day
9
Once a week or more but not every day
34
Once a month or more but not every week
27
Once a year or more but not every month
1
Never
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Letters and Memos — How often does the job require written letters and memos?
25
Every day
41
Once a week or more but not every day
2
Once a month or more but not every week
0
Once a year or more but not every month
33
Never
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Public Speaking — How often do you have to perform public speaking in this job?
18
Every day
0
Once a week or more but not every day
19
Once a month or more but not every week
16
Once a year or more but not every month
48
Never
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Responsibility for Outcomes and Results — How responsible is the worker for work outcomes and results of other workers?
12
Very high responsibility
20
High responsibility
4
Moderate responsibility
54
Limited responsibility
10
No responsibility
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Responsible for Others' Health and Safety — How much responsibility is there for the health and safety of others in this job?
15
Very high responsibility
11
High responsibility
25
Moderate responsibility
21
Limited responsibility
27
No responsibility
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Telephone — How often do you have telephone conversations in this job?
51
Every day
5
Once a week or more but not every day
0
Once a month or more but not every week
0
Once a year or more but not every month
44
Never
Interpersonal Relationships%Response
Work With Work Group or Team — How important is it to work with others in a group or team in this job?
27
Extremely important
63
Very important
8
Important
0
Fairly important
1
Not important at all

Structural Job Characteristics
%
Response
Consequence of Error — How serious would the result usually be if the worker made a mistake that was not readily correctable?
0
Extremely serious
10
Very serious
28
Serious
18
Fairly serious
45
Not serious at all
Structural Job Characteristics
%
Response
Degree of Automation — How automated is the job?
0
Completely automated
0
Highly automated
33
Moderately automated
1
Slightly automated
65
Not at all automated
Structural Job Characteristics
%
Response
Duration of Typical Work Week — Number of hours typically worked in one week.
19
More than 40 hours
46
40 hours
35
Less than 40 hours
Structural Job Characteristics
%
Response
Freedom to Make Decisions — How much decision-making freedom, without supervision, does the job offer?
47
A lot of freedom
31
Some freedom
21
Limited freedom
0
Very little freedom
1
No freedom
Structural Job Characteristics
%
Response
Frequency of Decision Making — How frequently is the worker required to make decisions that affect other people, the financial resources, and/or the image and reputation of the organization?
20
Every day
21
Once a week or more but not every day
36
Once a month or more but not every week
0
Once a year or more but not every month
23
Never
Environmental
%
Response
Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — What results do your decisions usually have on other people or the image or reputation or financial resources of your employer?
16
Very important results
38
Important results
1
Moderate results
45
Minor results
0
No results
Environmental
%
Response
Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job?
38
Very important results
21
Important results
41
Moderate results
0
Minor results
0
No results

The incidence of work as a marker with a limited education and language skills is at least highly suspect.  Markers need the ability to engage in reasoning level 2; have the significant worker functions of copying, transcribing, and posting data; possess a high school education or more in 86% of jobs; work with a group or team in 99% of jobs; engage in public speaking in 52% of jobs; deal with external customers in 92% of jobs; coordinate with other workers in 91% of jobs; and have more than occasional contact with others in 99% of jobs.  Of jobs in the group of marking clears, 65% of jobs are full-time  35% are part-time. 

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Vocational Expert Claims 229,000 Bakery Worker, Conveyor Line

ALJ asks Susan Allison for a light occupation, occasional reaching and handling, no fingering.  The vocational expert comes up with bakery worker, conveyor line.  The DOT/SCO says:

524.687-022  BAKERY WORKER, CONVEYOR LINE
Industry:     (bakery products)Reasoning:          1
Strength:     LMathematics:       1
SVP:            2Language:           1
GOE:            06.04.28Data:                     6 - Not Significant
DLU:            86People:                 8 - Not Significant
Things:                 7 - Significant

PHYSICAL DEMANDS:
CL
BA
ST
KN
CO
CW
RE
HA
FI
FE
TA
HE
TS
NA
FA
DP
AC
CV
FV
N
N
N
N
N
N
O
O
N
N
N
N
N
O
N
N
O
O
N

How many of those jobs exist, asks the ALJ.  The vocational expert thinks everyone in the room is stupid and says, 229,000 jobs.  

I know that number.  I saw it a long time ago.  Where was it?  

A journey to the BLS OES Data website.  I know it wasn't this year or the past four years.  Look at 2014, no.  The HTML presentation of occupations stops in 2014.  Everything before that is in an XLSX spreadsheet.  So I open the spread sheets for OES data in 2013 and 2012.  The job numbers for food processing workers, all other, and production workers, all other don't match the 229,000 jobs.  

I look at 2011 and can't find either 51-3099 or 51-9199.  Then I remember, the 2010 SOC split 51-9199 into the two groups.  In the 2010 and 2011 OES reports, BLS combined 51-3099 and 51-9199 into a new number -- 51-9399.  There it is!  But the number isn't right for 2011 either.  Maybe 2010.  Bingo:

OCC_CODE     OCC_TITLE                                             TOT_EMP      
51-9399         Production Workers, All Other*         229,240

A spreadsheet with 820 lines and 20 columns of data is just too much.  But I would like to get the HTML page for Production Workers, All Other -- 51-9399.  

I resorted to the Internet Archive: Wayback Machine.   The current BLS OES address uses oes519199.htm.  I use the address but change that second 1 to a 3.  I search in the Wayback Machine for https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes519399.htm and look for something in 2011 since the data is published a year in arrears.  I find seven hits between June and December 2011.  They should all be the same and here is the first 3 inches:

* This occupation has the same title, but not necessarily the same content, as the 2010 SOC occupation
This OES occupation is a combination of data collected for the 2010 SOC occupations 51-3099 Food Processing Workers, All Other, 51-9199 Production Workers, All Other and the 2000 SOC occupation 51-9199 Production Workers, All Other.

National estimates for this occupation
Industry profile for this occupation
Geographic profile for this occupation

National estimates for this occupation: Top

Employment estimate and mean wage estimates for this occupation:
Employment (1)Employment
RSE (3)
Mean hourly
wage
Mean annual
wage (2)
Wage RSE (3)
229,2401.9 %$14.89$30,9800.6 %

Gotcha, Susan.  Not only did you use the entire OES group, you used the data that is eight years old.  Not reliable.  That is our burden of proof -- to show that the testimony of the vocational expert is not reliable.  

A note about Occu Collect:  the snapshot of the report presented at the top of this blog is free for registering.  For those attending the NOSSCR conference in San Francisco, I will have a code for one free month trial with full access to all reports.  See you in three weeks.  

Kosher Inspector - 529.687-126; Coal Sampler - 922.687-038 - Occasional Handling, No Fingering

We used the  SCO and the aptitudes for dexterity  to show that there really are not a significant number of jobs for a person limited to lig...